To content

Alexander Skogberg

UX, Web & Writing

Writing

How to transfer VHS tapes to your Mac

Memories fade over time and some are easily lost forever, especially if they’re stored on old VHS tapes. This is my guide on how to transfer your VHS tapes to your Mac, so you can store them for the future.

When I came home for Christmas eight years ago in 2010, my parents had organized all of their old VHS tapes from when I was a kid. When we watched some of them, I realized that these tapes needed to be transfered to digital form before they deteriorated further.

I took me seven years, but last year I decided to finally transfer these tapes to digital form as a Christmas gift to my parents.

This is how I did it, step by step.

1. Getting the equipment

Transferring VHS tapes to a computer requires getting some equipment.

Luckily, my parents had already done a lot of the hard work by having not one but two VHS players in great shape (one broke down and we had to repair it for $72, but that’s another story).

This is the equipment I used (excluding my Macbook):

VHS transfer equipment
Clockwise from the top: VHS player, some of the VHS-C cassettes, VHS-C cassette adapter (with another VHS-C cassette beneath), video capture dongle from Plexgear and a SCART to RCA cable.
Read How to transfer VHS tapes to your Mac.

7 tips for holding a great talk

On April 28th (the day after From Business To Buttons 2017), I got a spot at Mike Monteiro’s workshop Presenting Work Like Your Life Depends On It. So, let me – with the help of Monteiro – give you some tips on how to hold a great presentation.

Mike Monteiro on stage at From Business To Buttons 2017

The tips can be found at the inUse blog.

/Alex

Prototype like a pro with inVision

For the past year and a half, I’ve been using the web app inVision for sharing design and making clickable prototypes. With this post I wanted to share some tips on how to prototype like a pro.

inVision is a widely popular web app for making clickable prototypes and sharing, storing and collaborating on design. It’s used by companies such as Netflix, Adobe, Twitter and Uber.

When working with inVision, you don’t create wireframes or graphic design in the app. This is done in your graphics editor of choice and you just upload the exported images to inVision.

Then, you place so called hotspots on these images that simulate the intended future behaviour of your design.

inVision has in no time at all turned into one of my all time favourite digital tools along Trello, Dropbox and Google Drive.

Here’s some of my tips on how to prototype like a pro with inVision.

Read Prototype like a pro with inVision.

The women that made me a better designer

Multiple women designers

A while back when browsing Twitter for new insights and learnings, I noticed that most of my go-to developers and designers were women. Being so accustomed to the male dominance in the field of computer science and engineering, I found this pretty cool!

With International Women’s Day taking place today, I wanted to give these women a shout-out. You most likely know who they are already. But if not, allow me to thank and introduce…

Multiple women designers
Read The women that made me a better designer.

The usability delights of Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt

One of my New Year’s resolutions was to post here on a more regular basis, but then I (finally) started playing Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt… So, to break my procrastination I decided to write a post about the usability delights of this wonderful game.

The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt is the third game in the epic fantasy saga from the Polish game developers CD Projekt Red. It was released on May 19, 2015.

The Witcher games are based on the fantasy books by Polish writer Andrzej Sapkowski. The books tell the story of the witcher (monster hunter) Geralt of Rivia, whom you also play as in all of the Witcher games.

I won’t go into great depths about the story of the game. If you’re interested, read A Beginner’s Guide to the World of the Witcher by Kotaku. The lore is as epic as in The Lord of the Rings and the politics is as complicated as in Game of Thrones.

But in short, You play as Geralt who is looking for his adoptive (sort of) ultra powerful daughter Ciri who is lost in war-torn world and being chased by a group of scary specters called the Wild Hunt.

Just as its backstory, the mechanics and interfaces of Witcher 3 are deep and complex. But CD Projekt Red has pulled it off remarkably well. Here’s six of my favorite usability delights of this game.

1. No crashing into trees on horseback

I’ve played quite a few games where you spend time on horseback. Mainly Nintendo’s classic Legend of Zelda games, but also Rockstar Games’ western epic Red Dead Redemption. I’ve always found it incredibly frustrating when you’re gloriously blazing through a field with the sun setting in the background only to be abruptly stopped when crashing into a tree. Ugh.

In Witcher 3, this is almost never happens. Even when you ride into the most dense of woods, you are subtly auto-aimed past the many trunks and branches. It’s such a welcomed change. Well done CD Projekt Red.

On horseback in Witcher 3
You won’t be crashing into these trees with your awesome auto-aiming horse.
Read The usability delights of Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt.
Much responsive Many CSS Very breakpoint So media query Such HTML Wow