Alexander Skogberg

UX, Web & Design

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How to transfer VHS tapes to your Mac

Memories fade over time and some are easily lost forever, especially if they’re stored on old VHS tapes. This is my guide on how to transfer your VHS tapes to your Mac, so you can store them for the future.

When I came home for Christmas eight years ago in 2010, my parents had organized all of their old VHS tapes from when I was a kid. When we watched some of them, I realized that these tapes needed to be transfered to digital form before they deteriorated further.

I took me seven years, but last year I decided to finally transfer these tapes to digital form as a Christmas gift to my parents.

This is how I did it, step by step.

1. Getting the equipment

Transferring VHS tapes to a computer requires getting some equipment.

Luckily, my parents had already done a lot of the hard work by having not one but two VHS players in great shape (one broke down and we had to repair it for $72, but that’s another story).

This is the equipment I used (excluding my Macbook):

VHS transfer equipment

Clockwise from the top: VHS player, some of the VHS-C cassettes, VHS-C cassette adapter (with another VHS-C cassette beneath), video capture dongle from Plexgear and a SCART to RCA cable.

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Portfolio update: customer portal for health company Feelgood

In 2017, Swedish health company Feelgood set out to combine some of their web-based systems into a single new portal for their clients. I was the only designer in a small multidisciplinary team and fully responsible for interaction design, graphic design and usability testing.

The Feelgood portal on both wide and small screens.

The Feelgood portal was built mobile first.

The portal was released in November 2017 to great feedback from Feelgood’s clients. It will be evaluated and improved further in 2018.

Read about the design process in my portfolio.

7 tips for holding a great talk

On April 28th (the day after From Business To Buttons 2017), I got a spot at Mike Monteiro’s workshop Presenting Work Like Your Life Depends On It. So, let me – with the help of Monteiro – give you some tips on how to hold a great presentation.

Mike Monteiro on stage at From Business To Buttons 2017

The tips can be found at the inUse blog.

/Alex

Prototype like a pro with inVision

For the past year and a half, I’ve been using the web app inVision for sharing design and making clickable prototypes. With this post I wanted to share some tips on how to prototype like a pro.

inVision is a widely popular web app for making clickable prototypes and sharing, storing and collaborating on design. It’s used by companies such as Netflix, Adobe, Twitter and Uber.

When working with inVision, you don’t create wireframes or graphic design in the app. This is done in your graphics editor of choice and you just upload the exported images to inVision.

Then, you place so called hotspots on these images that simulate the intended future behaviour of your design.

inVision has in no time at all turned into one of my all time favourite digital tools along Trello, Dropbox and Google Drive.

Here’s some of my tips on how to prototype like a pro with inVision.

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The women that made me a better designer

A while back when browsing Twitter for new insights and learnings, I noticed that most of my go-to developers and designers were women. Being so accustomed to the male dominance in the field of computer science and engineering, I found this pretty cool!

With International Women’s Day taking place today, I wanted to give these women a shout-out. You most likely know who they are already. But if not, allow me to thank and introduce…

Multiple women designers

Read all of The women that made me a better designer.

Much responsive Many CSS Very breakpoint So media query Such HTML Wow